Cookies

Notice: This website may or may not use or set cookies used by Google Ad-sense or other third party companies. If you do not wish to have cookies downloaded to your computer, please disable cookie use in your browser. Thank You.

Monday, September 20, 2010

Improvised Spears



Hard Wood Tip
4 Prong Fish Spear
3 Prong Fish Spear
Since the time of the caveman, the spear has been used as a hunting tool and weapon. Spear designs have come a long way since then, but the basics have remained throughout the ages.  The basics of taking a long hardwood stave and adding a killing or gathering tip to it will always remain.

A well made spear will give the survivalist the upper hand in many survival scenarios. The spear gives one a sense of protection against the wild, a sense of balance while walking the vast terrain, and gives the ability to help obtain food.

The spear gives you that distance you need between a predator and the wielder. That distance, with the ability to inflict pain, injury or death to an attacker may me the different between life or death in a wilderness or urban survival situation.

When time permits, the spear should be the first weapon or tool you should think about making before any other tool, that's if you do not already have a suitable source of protection, like a rifle or pistol. Even then I would still make one to use while walking about to help give you advanced warning of snakes and possible hidden holes beneath vegetation or snow.

A red or orange cloth or something similar can be tied to the end of the spear to be held high to help catch the attention of a rescue party if you happen to be in tall vegetation.  The spear has many uses- many that will save your life.

Stay Prepared! Stay Alive!

Charlie

10 comments:

  1. Restless Native UKOctober 29, 2010 at 8:33 AM

    Hey there Charlie,
    You have some good idea's about spear making here.
    I'd like to see you giving a flint knapped neolithic Version a try out?

    A main penetration point aswell as several other "blade's" Inserted and secured with pitch resin along one side just under the main point.
    (Work's great with primitive arrow's too)

    I've made a few myself with some devestating effect's!

    Stay safe and be Well my friend

    ReplyDelete
  2. Restless Native, thanks for your support. I'm working on several versions of spear tips, which I will post. Thanks for the input, it gives more ideas to post. It just takes me time since I do a lot of video work and stuff. I'm not very good a flint knapping, but I'm trying to teach myself a technique of knapping that will get the job done in half the time, but will not look as good as the original neolithic versions.

    Stay Prepared! Stay Alive!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice the only kind of wood in Canada where I live is oak,ash and maple will that be good wood to make a spear

    ReplyDelete
  4. Howy, Thanks for the kind comments and for visiting my site. Oak, ash and maple would make a much better spear than the wood I was using. Those types of wood make a good spear point just by sharpening the ends and heating over a fire to fire harden the tip. This is if you dont have a spear tip of any kind to put on the shaft. Have Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year my friend.

    Charlie

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks now I might be able to make a spear or a bow or some thing like that

    ReplyDelete
  6. Where can I buy para-chord in Canada

    ReplyDelete
  7. Howy, I think paracord may be a specialty item in Canada. You may be likely to find them in your local camping and sports stores or maybe hardware stores. If cant find it there, the next best place to get it inexpensively and at different colors and lengths would on the internet. I suggest www.cheaperthandirt.com, this is where I get all my cordage.

    Charlie

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thank I might be able to buy some then make somd of the thinks that you make thanks again Merry christmas and Happy Now Year

    ReplyDelete
  9. hey werebi live i dont have the best wood and i was wondering if maple wood would work for a spear thanks. love yous site.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maple would do fine if you are able to get a nice straight piece. The shaft should be from 5-6 feet long. If you cant get a piece that long, you can always get to smaller pieces and put them together to make one longer shaft.

      Delete